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Blagoveshtenie: Celebrating the Day of Epiphany in Bulgaria

The Day of Epiphany is a Christian holiday on which people celebrate the epiphany of the триединен Бог (triedinen Bog), or “triune God.” In this article, you’ll learn more about how Christians view the Epiphany holiday, and more specifically, how Bulgarians celebrate Epiphany.

At BulgarianPod101.com, we always aim to ensure that your language-learning journey is both fun and informative—starting with this article on Epiphany! Bulgarian customs may just surprise you. ;)

Let’s get started.

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1. What is Epiphany?

Epiphany is a very old holiday. According to the Orthodox Church, this is the day Jesus Christ was baptized in the River Jordan. Thus the holiday is also called “Baptism of the Lord.” The name Bogoyavlenie is formed by two words: bogo, meaning “God’s,” and yavlenie, which is a word meaning “appearance” or “manifestation.”

According to Christianity, at the baptism of Jesus Christ, the secret of the Holy Trinity appeared—the Son Jesus Christ in human form, the Holy Spirit as a dove alighting upon Jesus, and the Divine Voice of the Heavenly Father. Hence the name Bogoyavlenie.

Jesus Christ was baptized in the River Jordan by John the Baptist (Yoan Krastitel). The next day on the calendar, January 7, is Ivanovden—name-day of Ivan, Ivanka, etc., and the feast of Sveti Yoan Krastitel (Saint John the Baptist).

2. When is Epiphany in Bulgaria?

Adoration of the Magi

Each year, Epiphany (Bogoyavlenie) is celebrated on January 6 and is also a name-day for people carrying the names Yordan, Yordanka, and similar names. This is because these names derive from the name of the River Jordan (Yordan).

Other common names celebrated on this name-day are Bozhidar, Bozhan, Boyan, Bogdana, and Dancho.

3. Reading Practice: Bulgarian Celebration of the Epiphany

Swimming in Water

On Epiphany Day, Bulgarian traditions and customs reflect the theme of baptism.

Do you know how Bulgarian Christians celebrate Epiphany? Read the Bulgarian text below to find out, and check your reading skills against the English version.

На Йордановден се яде постно и на трапезата трябва задължително да присъстват царевичен хляб или царевични питки.

Популярен обичай на Богоявление е да се хвърля кръст в леденостудените води на реките. Обикновено мъже скачат да го уловят. Този, който го намери се смята, че ще бъде благословен с късмет.

On Yordanovden, people fast, and there must be cornbread or flat corn loaves on the table.

A popular custom on Epiphany is to cast a cross into the ice-cold water of the rivers. Usually, men jump in to take it; the one who finds it is considered to be blessed with luck.

4. Many Names

Epiphany in the Bulgarian culture is a holiday with many names. Do you know what they are?

Besides Baptism of the Lord, this day is also called Yordanovden, Winter Feast of the Cross, Enlightenment, Waters, and even Vodokrashti, because of the association with Jesus’s baptizing in the waters of Jordan.

5. Essential Bulgarian Vocab for Epiphany

Cleaning Hands in Water

Here’s some Bulgarian vocabulary you need to know for Epiphany!

  • състезавам се (sastezavam se) — compete
  • Кръщавам (krashtavam) — baptize
  • Кръст (krast) — cross
  • Мъдрец (madrets) — Wise Men
  • хвърлям във водата (hvarlyam vav vodata) — toss in the water
  • мъже танцуват в реката (mazhe tantsuvat v rekata) — men dancing in the river
  • Почитам (pochitam) — worship
  • поклонение на влъхвите (poklonenie na vlahvite) — adoration of the Magi
  • Водосвет (vodosvet) — sanctification of the water
  • триединен Бог (triedinen Bog) — triune God
  • Пречистване (prechistvane) — purification
  • скачам във водата (skacham vav vodata) — jump in the water
  • мокри дрехи (mokri drehi) — wet clothes

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Bulgarian Epiphany vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Bulgarian Epiphany traditions and the story behind this significant Christian holiday.

Do you celebrate Epiphany in your country? If so, how? Let us know in the comments!

If you’re interested in learning more about Bulgarian culture, or want to learn some wintery words to get you through the next couple of months, you may find the following pages useful:

Learning Bulgarian doesn’t have to be boring or overwhelming—with BulgarianPod101.com, it can even be fun! If you’re serious about mastering the language, but don’t have the time for the unnecessary hassle, create your free lifetime account today. You’ll be learning Bulgarian like never before!

Happy Bulgarian learning! :)

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The Bulgarian Calendar: Talking About Dates in Bulgarian

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through BulgarianPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Bulgarian, as well as the months in Bulgarian to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Bulgarian?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can BulgarianPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Bulgarian


1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Bulgarian?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Bulgarian. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “петък” (”petak,” Friday) with “събота” (”sabota,” Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “юли” (”yuli,” July), but you booked a flight for “юни” (”yuni,” June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Bulgarian calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Bulgaria, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Какво ще правиш този уикенд?

Kakvo shtye pravish tozi uikyend?
“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Bulgarian or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Пътувам този уикенд.

Patuvam tozi uikend.
“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Bulgaria, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Планирам да си остана у дома.

Planiram da si ostana u doma.
“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Тази седмица съм зает.

Tazi sedmitsa sam zaet.
“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Утре съм свободен.

Utre sam svoboden.
“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Можем ли да отменим това?

Mozhem li da otmenim tova?
“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Ще имам достатъчно време в края на месеца.

Shte imam dostatachno vreme v kraya na mesetsa.
“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Кога е най-подходящото време, което те утройва?

Koga e nay-podhodyashtoto vreme, koeto te utroyva?
“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Удобна ли е тази дата с теб?

Udobna li e tazi data s teb?
“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Свободен ли сте в този ден?

Svoboden li ste v tozi den?
“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Може ли да го направим възможно най-скоро?

Mozhe li da go napravim vazmozhno nay-skoro?
“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Аз съм на разположение всяка вечер.

Az sam na razpolozhenie vsyaka vecher.
“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Трябва да планирам това предварително.

Tryabva da planiram tova predvaritelno.
“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Трябва да намерим друга дата

Tryabva da namerim druga data
“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. Не мога да го направя на този ден.

Ne moga da go napravya na tozi den.
“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Bulgaria or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can BulgarianPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Bulgarian. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

BulgarianPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Bulgarian speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Bulgarian online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Bulgarian host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Bulgarian easily yet correctly, BulgarianPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Bulgarian need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Bulgarian

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At BulgarianPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Bulgarian Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How BulgarianPod101 Can Help You Learn Bulgarian Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Bulgarian


1. Why Is It Important to Know Bulgarian Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Bulgarian culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, BulgarianPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Bulgaria.

Here are some of the most important Bulgarian vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Bulgarian Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
семейство (semeystvo)
Great grandfather
прадядо (pradyado)
Mother
майка (mayka)
Grandmother
баба (baba)
Father
баща (bashta)
Grandfather
дядо (dyado)
Wife
съпруга (sapruga)
Grandchild
внук (vnuk)
Husband
съпруг (saprug)
Granddaughter
внучка (vnuchka)
Parent
родител (roditel)
Grandson
внук (vnuk)
Child
дете (dete)
Aunt
леля (lelya)
Daughter
дъщеря (dyshterya)
Uncle
чичо (chicho)
Sister
сестра (sestra)
Niece
племенница (plemennica)
Brother
брат (brat)
Nephew
племенник (plemennik)
Younger sister
по-малка сестра (po-malka sestra)
Younger brother
по-малък брат (po-malyk brat)
Older brother
батко (batko)
Great grandmother
прабаба (prababa)
Cousin
братовчед (bratovched)
Mother-in-law
свекърва, тъща (svekarva, tashta)
Father-in-law
свекър, тъст (svekar, tast)
Sister-in-law
зълва, балдъза (zalva, baldaza)
Brother-in-law
зет, девер (zet, dever)
Partner
партньор (partnyor)

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Bulgarian Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Bulgarian language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Bulgarian literature, or make use of ours!

Човек не избира семейството си. То е негов Божи дар, както и той е дар за близките си.

Chovek ne izbira semeystvoto si. To e negov Bozhi dar, kakto i toy e dar za blizkite si.
“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Семейството не е нещо важно. То е всичко.

Semeystvoto ne e neshto vazhno. To e vsichko.
“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Семейство значи, никой да не бъде изоставен или забравен.

Semeystvo znachi, nikoy da ne bade izostaven ili zabraven.
“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Моето семейство е моята сила и моята слабост.

Moeto semeystvo e moyata sila i moyata slabost.
“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Семейството е един от шедьоврите на природата.

Semeystvoto e edin ot shedyovrite na prirodata.
“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Когато настъпи беда, семейството е, което ви подкрепя.

Kogato nastapi beda, semeystvoto e, koeto vi podkrepya.
“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Семейството е първата и жизнено важна клетка на обществото

Semeystvoto e parvata i zhizneno vazhna kletka na obshtestvoto
“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Не съществува такова нещо като забавление за цялото семейство.

Ne sashtestvuva takova neshto kato zabavlenie za tsyaloto semeystvo.
“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Трябва да защитаваш честта си. И семейството си.

Tryabva da zashtitavash chestta si. I semeystvoto si.
“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Всички щастливи семейства си приличат; всяко нещастно семейство е нещастно по свой начин.

Vsichki shtastlivi semeystva si prilichat; vsyako neshtastno semeystvo e neshtastno po svoy nachin.
“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Bulgarian vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. семейство a. My male child
2. майка b. My older male sibling
3. баща c. My female sibling
4. съпруга d. My child’s child
5. съпруг e. My child’s female child
6. родител f. My female parent
7. дете g. My grandparent’s mother
8. дъщеря h. Mother to one of my parents
9. син i. Relatives
10. сестра j. My female child
11. брат k. My younger male sibling
12. по-малка сестра l. Male spouse
13. по-малък брат m. The father of one of my parents
14. батко n. My child’s male child
15. прабаба o. My children’s father or mother
16. прадядо p. The sister of one of my parents
17. баба q. The brother of one of my parents
18. дядо r. My male parent
19. внук s. My sibling’s female child
20. внучка t. My sibling’s male child
21. внук u. My male sibling
22. леля v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. чичо w. Female spouse
24. племенница x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. племенник y. The person I am a parent to
26. братовчед z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at BulgarianPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How BulgarianPod101 Can Help You Learn Bulgarian Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Bulgarian vocabulary!

BulgarianPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Bulgarian easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Bulgarian culture, including the Bulgarian family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Bulgarian word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Bulgarian Key Phrase List
4 - A free Bulgarian online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Bulgarian Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Bulgarian language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, BulgarianPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Bulgarian mastery!

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BulgarianPod101’s Essential Bulgarian Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Bulgaria. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at BulgarianPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Bulgarian travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Bulgarian friends or travel guide with your flawless Bulgarian!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. BulgarianPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Bulgarian people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Bulgarian phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Bulgarian. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Bulgaria will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Bulgarian.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Bulgarian, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Благодаря / Blagodarya (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Bulgarian.

2) Говорите ли английски? / Govorite li angliyski? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Има ли автобус от летището до града? / Ima li avtobus ot letishteto do grada? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Това дали е правилният автобус за летището? / Tova dali e pravilniyat avtobus za letishteto? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Извинете, каква е цената на билета? / Izvinete, kakva e tsenata na bileta? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Имам резервация / Imam rezervatsiya (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Имате ли свободни места за тази вечер? / Imate li svobodni mesta za tazi vecher? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Къде се намира гарата? / Kade se namira garata? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Аз съм алергичен към фъстъци / Az sam alergichen kam fastatsi (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Bulgarian.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Bulgarian on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Bulgarian if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Предлагате ли някакви вегетариански ястия? / Predlagate li nyakakvi vegetarianski yastiya? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Bulgarian.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Може ли да получа карта? / Mozhe li da polucha karta? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Колко струва това? / Kolko struva tova? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Bulgarian will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Приемате ли кредитни карти? / Priemate li kreditni karti? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Безплатен ли е Wi-Fi интернета? / Bezplaten li e Wi-Fi interneta? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Извинете, бихте ли ми направили снимка? / Izvinete, bihte li mi napravili snimka? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Бихте ли ми препоръчали нещо? / Bihte li mi preporachali neshto? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Bulgarian friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Бих искал място за непушачи, моля / Bih iskal myasto za nepushachi, molya (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Вода, моля / Voda, molya (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Може ли сметката? / Mozhe li smetkata? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Какво ще препоръчате като сувенир? / Kakvo shte preporachate kato suvenir? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. BulgarianPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Bulgarian? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

BulgarianPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Bulgarian reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Bulgarian word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Bulgarian Key Phrase List
- A free Bulgarian online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Bulgarian Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Bulgarian-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Bulgarian speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Bulgarian friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With BulgarianPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Bulgarian Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Bulgaria, using the correct Bulgarian numbers for counting in Bulgarian could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Bulgarian Numbers?
  3. Learning Bulgarian Numbers
  4. Why Choose BulgarianPod101 to Learn all about Bulgarian Numbers?

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1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Bulgarian Numbers?

For us at BulgarianPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Bulgaria or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Bulgarian Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Bulgarian number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Bulgarian numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Bulgarian numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Bulgarian speaker and friendly BulgarianPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Bulgarian numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Bulgarian number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Bulgarian words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose BulgarianPod101 to Learn all about Bulgarian Numbers?

BulgarianPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! BulgarianPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Bulgarian!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Bulgarian with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Bulgarian dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about BulgarianPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Bulgarian teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Bulgarian word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Bulgarian level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with BulgarianPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Bulgarian numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Bulgarian on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Bulgarian, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Bulgarian.

At Learn Bulgarian, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Bulgarian in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Bulgarian

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Bulgarian. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Kamen eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

Хайде да пробваме новия удон ресторант. (Hayde da probvame noviya udon restorant.)
“Let’s try out the new udon restaurant.”

1- хайде да пробваме (hayde da probvame)

First is an expression meaning - “let’s try out”.
This is a common phrase you can use to issue a general invitation for people to try out a new place, such as a club, a restaurant, or a cafe.

2- новия удон ресторант (noviya udon restorant)

Then comes the phrase - “the new udon restaurant.”
Going out with friends, especially on a week day, often involves dining out. When you are meeting the same group of friends regularly, you might want to look for different places to meet at. An invitation to try out a new place is also an easy conversation starter.

COMMENTS

In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

1- Какъв е адресът? (Kakav e adresat?)

His girlfriend, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “What is the address?”
Use this expression to show your interest in the poster’s suggestion.

2- Дано ви хареса, аз няма да успея. (Dano vi haresa, az nyama da uspeya.)

His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “I hope you like it, I won’t be able to make it.”
Use this expression if you cannot join the party, and want to offer an explanation, plus wish the partygoers well.

3- Сайтът им е добър. (Saytat im e dobar.)

His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Their website is good.”
Use this expression to show you are interested in the topic, and has done some research.

4- Всичко изглежда толкова вкусно. (Vsichko izglezhda tolkova vkusno.)

His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Everything looks so delicious.”
Use this expression to show your appreciation of the food.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • пробвам (probvam): “try out”
  • ресторант (restorant): “restaurant”
  • адрес (adres): “address”
  • успявам (uspyavam): “succeed”
  • сайт (sayt): “website”
  • толкова (tolkova): “so”
  • вкусен (vkusen): “delicious”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Bulgarian restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Bulgarian

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Bulgarian phrases in posts when you visit a shopping mall.

    Yana shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Този уикенд ще има разпродажба в мола (Tozi uikend shte ima razprodazhba v mola)
    “There’s a sale at the mall this weekend.”

    1- този уикенд ще има (tozi uikend shte ima)

    First is an expression meaning “this weekend there will be”.
    It is usually over the weekend when ladies have enough time to go shopping with their friends. The day of a sale is a good occasion to meet, talk, look around and shop for clothes or shoes with your friends.

    2- разпродажба в мола (razprodazhba v mola)

    Then comes the phrase - “a sale in the mall”.
    Shopping malls are convenient as they allow people to shop for different items in one place. There was a sharp rise in the number of new malls that opened in the cities, which created more fierce competition to attract shoppers. Therefore, malls regularly organize sales weekends throughout the entire year.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Може ли да взема децата? (Mozhe li da vzema detsata?)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Can I take the kids?”
    Use this question if you are interested to visit the mall yourself, and need more specific information.

    2- Тъкмо взех заплата. (Takmo vzeh zaplata.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “I just got my paycheck”.
    Use this expression to imply that you might go shopping yourself, and to make conversation.

    3- Ще съм извън града. (Shte sam izvan grada.)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll be out of town”.
    Use this expression to offer an explanation as to why you cannot join the shopping duo.

    4- Аз ще пасувам. (Az shte pasuvam.)

    Her boyfriend, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll pass (up)”.
    Use this expression to show you are not interested to join the shopping spree.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • разпродажба (razprodazhba): “sale”
  • дете (dete): “kid”
  • тъкмо (takmo): “just”
  • вземам (vzemam): “take”
  • заплата (zaplata): “salary”
  • извън (izvan): “outside”
  • град (grad): “city”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Bulgarian

    Sporting events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Bulgarian.

    Kamen plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Да поритаме ли малко? (Da poritame li malko?)
    “Shall we play some soccer?”

    1- да поритаме ли (da poritame li)

    First is an expression meaning “shall we play some soccer”.
    By changing the prefix of a main verb in Bulgarian, you can often slightly alter the meaning of the verb. In front of some verbs, you can put the prefix “по”, which implies that you will perform the specific action only for a short time. Depending on the situation, it might also mean that you are not taking the action seriously.

    2- малко (malko)

    Then comes the phrase - “a bit”.
    Although the short action is implied in the verb, we sometimes add “a bit” in the sentence to indicate our intention. You can also say “поспя - pospya”, which means “to take a nap”, “почета - pocheta”, which means “to read for a while”, or “поработя - porabotya”, which means “to work for some time”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Още изглеждаш в добра форма. (Oshte izglezhdash v dobra forma.)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “You’re still in good shape”.
    Use this expression to compliment the poster on his appearance.

    2- Къде е това място? (Kade e tova myasto?)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Where is this place?”
    Use this expression to show you are interested in the topic, and would like more information about the location of the poster.

    3- Още те бива. (Oshte te biva.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “You’re still good.”
    Another expression with which to compliment the poster.

    4- Мъжете си остават момчета завинаги. (Mazhete si ostavat momcheta zavinagi.)

    His girlfriend, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “Men will always remain boys.”
    Use this common saying to tease the poster, if you’re his girlfriend or very good platonic friend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ритам (ritam): “to play soccer”
  • поритам (poritam): “to play soccer for fun”
  • малко (malko): “a little, some”
  • изглеждам (izglezhdam): “look like”
  • форма (forma): “shape”
  • бива ме (biva me): “be good at”
  • завинаги (zavinagi): “forever”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Bulgarian

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Yana shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Всички подивяхме на това ретро. (Vsichki podivyahme na tova retro.)
    “We all went crazy to this retro song.”

    1- всички подивяхме (vsichki podivyahme)

    First is an expression meaning “we all got crazy.”
    As you remember, in Bulgarian we can often skip the personal pronoun in a sentence, as the verb conjugation gives clear indication about the person and number. The only exception is third-person singular, where we need the personal pronoun to explicitly indicate the gender form. Be mindful here with the verb “подивяхме” ( “crazy” ), which could have a negative connotation, depending on the context.

    2- на това ресто (na tova resto)

    Then comes the phrase - “at this retro song”.
    When it comes to music, “да подивея” indicates that people totally loved the performance. Do not be surprised if you get invited to a retro party and end up listening to music from your own school years. The definition of retro music has changed in recent years as it now represents the style and songs that were performed nearly 10 years ago.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Страхотен клип. (Strahoten klip.)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Great video.”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the posted music video.

    2- Защо ме няма там? (Zashto me nyama tam?)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Why am I not there?”
    Use this expression as a way to indicate your appreciation of the music, or to indicate that you’re feeling excluded, depending on the situation.

    3- Оглеждай се за някой готин пич. (Oglezhday se za nyakoy gotin pich.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “Look out for some cool guy.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling humorous and want your friend to find you a boyfriend.

    4- Пусни малко лайф! (Pusni malko layf!)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Share some live!”
    Use this expression if you are interested to watch a streamed, real-time video from the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • всички (vsichki): “all, everyone”
  • подивявам (podivyavam): “go crazy”
  • ретро (retro): “retro”
  • страхотен (strahoten): “great”
  • нямам (nyamam): “have no”
  • готин (gotin): “cool”
  • пич (pich): “dude, guy”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Bulgarian Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Bulgarian!

    Kamen goes to a classical concert, posts an image of the orchestra, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    На бароков концерт през седмицата (Na barokov kontsert prez sedmitsata)
    “To a baroque concert on a work day.”

    1- на бароков концерт (na barokov kontsert)

    First is an expression meaning “to a baroque concert.”
    Listening to classical music is not too popular in Bulgaria, but it is always considered to be of classy taste. Classical music concerts, as well as theatre performances, traditionally start between 6 to 7 pm. Therefore, they often take place on week days and are a possible pastime at the end of the working day.

    2- през седмицата (prez sedmitsata)

    Then comes the phrase - “during the (work) week.”
    Friday and Saturday nights are usually the days when people in Bulgaria go clubbing, since they can sleep late during the weekend. Sunday evenings and week days are the times when people like to go to social events - the theater, meetups, professional gatherings, dinner with friends.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Има останали билети, нали? (Ima ostanali bileti, nali?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “There are tickets left, aren’t there?”
    Use this expression if you’re interested to join the poster, or if you’re being sarcastic about the popularity of classical music concert tickets.

    2- Добър избор! (Dobar izbor!)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Good choice!”
    Use this expression if you feel positive about the poster’s activity.

    3- Убийствена скука. (Ubiystvena skuka.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Deadly boring.”
    Use this expression if you disagree from the previous comment, and think the poster’s activity boring.

    4- Ще те пренесе в друга реалност… (Shte te prenese v druga realnost̷ ;)

    His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll transfer you to another reality…”
    Use this expression if you truly appreciate classical music, and think that attending a live classical concert will a transcending experience for the poster. Or use it to be sarcastic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • концерт (kontsert): “concert”
  • седмица (sedmitsa): “week”
  • билет (bilet): “ticket”
  • избор (izbor): “choice”
  • друг (drug): “another”
  • убийствен (ubiystven): “killing”
  • пренасям (prenasyam): “carry over, transfer”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Bulgarian

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Bulgarian phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Yana accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Ужас, счупи се дисплеят на телефона ми! (Uzhas, schupi se displeyat na telefona mi!)
    “Crap, my phone display is broken!”

    1- Ужас (Uzhas)

    First is an expression meaning “horror, crap”.
    When used at the beginning of a sentence, this word indicates that we want to say something that would grab people’s attention and that we are going to announce something disturbing and negative in nature.

    2- счупи се дисплея на телефона ми (schupi se displeya na telefona mi)

    Then comes the phrase - “my phone display got broken”.
    Possessive pronouns in Bulgarian have two forms - normal and short. The normal form comes in front of the noun, while the short form goes after the noun - “моя телефон, телефона ми”. During an informal conversation, Bulgarians tend to use the shorter form, unless they want to explicitly highlight whose possession they are talking about.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Нали помниш за срещата ни? (Nali pomnish za sreshtata ni?)

    Her supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “You remember about our meeting, don’t you?”
    Use this expression if you want to make sure that the poster knows of or remember your arrangements - presumably because notice of the meeting was sent via text.

    2- Спокойно, ще го оправим. (Spokoyno, shte go opravim.)

    Her boyfriend, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “Calm down, we’ll fix it.”
    Use this expression if you want to reassure your girlfriend that the situation is under control.

    3- Тъкмо повод да си вземеш нов. (Takmo povod da si vzemesh nov.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a good excuse to buy a new one.”
    Make this suggestion if you wish to be supportive.

    4- Голяма работа. (Golyama rabota.)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “No big deal.”
    Use this expression to share your personal opinion about the situation, trivializing the incident the poster is upset about.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • да счупя (da schupya): “break”
  • помня (pomnya): “remember”
  • среща (sreshta): “meeting”
  • спокойно (spokoyno): “quietly”
  • оправям (opravyam): “fix”
  • повод (povod): “occasion”
  • работа (rabota): “work, job”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Bulgarian. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Bulgarian

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Bulgarian!

    Kamen gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Тази вечер само някакви сериали по телевизията. (Tazi vecher samo nyakakvi seriali po televiziyata.)
    “There are only (some) series on TV this evening.”

    1- тази вечер само (tazi vecher samo)

    First is an expression meaning - “tonight only”.
    People in Bulgaria often use social media to express feelings, memories, political views, and so on. When they express feelings, they tend to be concise. This is probably the only occasion when they are able to express their meaning even if they skip the verb.

    2- някакви сериали по телевизията (nyakakvi seriali po televiziyata)

    Then comes the phrase - “some series on TV.”
    Although online video is getting more and more popular, TV is still considered the traditional media for news and entertainment in the evening. TV series, reality shows and talk shows tend to be the most popular content during primetime. During the weekend, you will more often find magazine shows, documentaries and movies.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Прочети една книга. (Procheti edna kniga.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Read a book.”
    Use this expression to offer an alternative to watching TV.

    2- Да намина към теб? (Da namina kam teb?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Shall I come by?”
    Use this expression to show you want to be helpful to the poster.

    3- Съжалявам, срещата няма край. (Sazhalyavam, sreshtata nyama kray.)

    His girlfriend, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “Sorry, the meeting was endless.”
    Use this expression to offer a reason as to why you were not there to amuse the poster and alleviate his boredom. It also expresses regret.

    4- Радвай се на тишината. (Radvay se na tishinata.)

    His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy the silence.”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion to indicate that being alone and bored need not be a bad experience.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • някакъв (nyakakav): “some, any”
  • сериал (serial): “series”
  • да прочета (da procheta): “read through”
  • съжалявам (sazhalyavam): “sorry”
  • среща (sreshta): “meeting”
  • край (kray): “end”
  • тишина (tishina): “silence”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Bulgarian

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Bulgarian about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Yana feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Толкова съм изтощена, не мога даже и да мисля. (Tolkova sam iztoshtena, ne moga dazhe i da mislya.)
    “I’m so exhausted that I can’t even think.”

    1- толкова съм изтощена (tolkova sam iztoshtena)

    First is an expression meaning - “I’m so exhausted”.
    There are three gender forms in Bulgarian, and they apply to different parts of speech, among which are adjectives. In this particular case, we can easily guess that we have a female speaker, as the feminine form of the adjective “изтощена” is used.

    2- не мога даже и да мисля (ne moga dazhe i da mislya)

    Then comes the phrase - “I cannot even think”.
    It is very easy to create the negative form of a verb - you simply put “не - ne” in front of it and voila, you have it. The only exception is the verb “имам” to have, the negative form of which is “нямам”. Never use “не имам”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Обещавам ти един масаж. (Obeshtavam ti edin masazh.)

    Her boyfriend, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “I promise to give you a massage.”
    Use this expression to show you wish to be supportive and helpful to your girlfriend.

    2- Срещата беше наистина дълга. (Sreshtata beshe naistina dalga.)

    Her supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “The meeting was really long.”
    Use this expression to be empathetic by offering an explanation.

    3- Един фреш винаги помага. (Edin fresh vinagi pomaga.)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “A fresh juice always helps.”
    Use this expression to make a useful suggestion that could be helpful to the poster.

    4- Утре е петък - време за почивка. (Utre e petak - vreme za pochivka.)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “It’s Friday tomorrow - time to (have a) rest.”
    This is another comment that offers a helpful suggestion in order to help the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • толкова (tolkova): “so”
  • изтощен (iztoshten): “tired”
  • мисля (mislya): “think”
  • обещавам (obeshtavam): “promise”
  • масаж (masazh): “massage”
  • дълъг (dalag): “long”
  • винаги (vinagi): “always”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Bulgarian! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Bulgarian

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Bulgarian.

    Kamen suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Тази сутрин - посещение до Бърза помощ. (Tazi sutrin - poseshtenie do Barza pomosht.)
    “This morning - a visit to the Emergency room.”

    1- Тази сутрин (Tazi sutrin)

    First is an expression meaning “This morning.”
    Because you can often skip the personal pronoun in a sentence when talking in Bulgarian, there is some flexibility when it comes to the sentence structure. You can start the sentence with the verb - “отидох до Бърза помощ”- I went to the Emergency room. Or you can also start the sentence with an indication about the time - “тази сутрин” which means “this morning”, “утре вечер” which means “tomorrow evening”, and so on.

    2- посещение до Бърза помощ (poseshtenie do Barza pomosht)

    Then comes the phrase - “a visit to the Emergency room.”
    A visit to the Emergency room is always associated with a negative personal experience or some kind of accident. The Emergency room is also where you look for medical help during the night. “Бърза” actually means “fast” and not “urgent”, such as in the case of an emergency.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Какви ги вършиш? (Kakvi gi varshish?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “What have you been doing?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concerned for the poster’s wellbeing, and would like to know more.

    2- Оправяй се бързо! (Opravyay se barzo!)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Get better soon!”
    Use this expression to be compassionate and wish the poster a speedy recovery.

    3- Можеше и по-зле да е. (Mozheshe i po-zle da e.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “It could have been worse.”
    Use this expression if you think that reminding the poster of worse could be helpful.

    4- Горкият, сигурно боли. (Gorkiyat, sigurno boli.)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Poor you. It surely is painful.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling compassionate and caring.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • посещение (poseshtenie): “visit”
  • Бърза помощ (Barza pomosht): “Emergency”
  • върша (varsha): “do, make”
  • оправям се (opravyam se): “get better”
  • зле (zle): “badly”
  • боля (bolya): “hurt”
  • сигурно (sigurno): “certainly, surely”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Bulgarian

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Yana feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Днес обещаваха слънце, а то - потискаща мъгла. (Dnes obeshtavaha slantse, a to - potiskashta magla.)
    “They promised a sunny day today, but what we have is an oppressive fog.”

    1- Днес обещаваха слънце, (Dnes obeshtavaha slantse,)

    First is an expression meaning - “They have promised a sunny day today”.
    Verbs in Bulgarian mostly come in pairs. One verb in the pair implies continuity of the action (обещавам), whereas the second one implies completion (обещая). However, both verbs share the same translation in English, which might create confusion at the beginning.

    2- а то - потискаща мъгла (a to - potiskashta magla)

    Then comes the phrase - “but it is an oppressive fog”.
    In Bulgaria, the fog is generally associated with negative feelings of blurred vision, tangled thoughts or feeling lost. The word is often used in phrases to express similar conditions: “в главата ми е пълна мъгла” literally translates as “It is an absolute fog in my head” and is used to express that the person’s thoughts are tangled and that they do not see a clear direction.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ще отмине. (Shte otmine.)

    Her supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll pass.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling confident that the situation is not serious.

    2- Тъкмо време за в офиса. (Takmo vreme za v ofisa.)

    Her boyfriend, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “Just the right time to be at the office.”
    Use this comment if you want to be humorous with some sarcasm.

    3- Поне не вали. (Pone ne vali.)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “At least it’s not raining.”
    Use this expression to remind the poster that things could have been worse.

    4- А на мен ми e тайнствено. (A na men mi е taynstveno.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “It feels so mysterious to me.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion about the fog.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • обещавам (obeshtavam): “promise”
  • потискащ (potiskasht): “oppressive”
  • мъгла (magla): “fog”
  • време (vreme): “weather”
  • да отмина (da otmina): “pass by”
  • офис (ofis): “office”
  • тайнствен (taynstven): “mysterious”
  • How would you comment in Bulgarian when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Bulgarian

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Kamen changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Yana, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Какво повече да кажа - обвързан (Kakvo poveche da kazha - obvarzan)
    “What more shall I say - in a relationship.”

    1- какво повече да кажа (kakvo poveche da kazha)

    First is an expression meaning “What more shall I say”.
    It might sound stereotypical, but men in Bulgaria do not express extreme positive feelings such as enthusiasm or excitement over or in relationships. This transfers to the web as well, where they tend to express opinions rather than feelings.

    2- обвързан (obvarzan)

    Then comes the phrase - “in a relationship”.
    When it comes to relationships in particular, it is easy to see why men would prefer not to mention the event by only changing their status. The word “обвързан” also means “bound/tied up”, and is somewhat associated with the state of helplessness.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Много любов! (Mnogo lyubov!)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Lots of love!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and enthusiastic about the announcement.

    2- Предаде се, братле. (Predade se, bratle.)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “You gave up, bro.”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster.

    3- И какво - край на ергенските купони? (I kakvo - kray na ergenskite kuponi?)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Now what - no more bachelor parties?”
    This is another comment in the vein of the previous one, which is to use negative humour.

    4- Не е страшно, спокойно. (Ne e strashno, spokoyno.)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “It’s not scary, relax.”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • повече (poveche): “more”
  • да кажа (da kazha): “to say”
  • обвързан (obvarzan): “bound, in a relationship”
  • предавам се (predavam se): “give up, surrender”
  • братле (bratle): “bro, brother”
  • ергенски (ergenski): “bachelor”
  • спокойно (spokoyno): “quietly, patiently”
  • What would you say in Bulgarian when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Bulgarian

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Bulgarian.

    Yana is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Най-хубавият ден с мъжа мечта до мен. (Nay-hubaviyat den s mazha mechta do men.)
    “The best day ever, with my dream man by my side.”

    1- Най-хубавият ден с (Nay-hubaviyat den s)

    First is an expression meaning “The best day with”.
    While men do not easily express positive feelings openly, especially about relationships, women rarely hold back. They frequently use superlative forms such as “the best” or “the most beautiful” and talk easily about personal events such as their wedding day.

    2- мъжа мечта до мен (mazha mechta do men)

    Then comes the phrase - “my dream man by my side.”
    Women dream about getting married to their “dream man”, whereas marriage for men feels as if they get shackled. This is a common stereotype. In Bulgarian, you can easily turn the word marriage into the verb “to discard, to throw for scrap”. Therefore, it is a common joke among close friends to say “they’ve been scrapped” instead of “they’ve got married”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Толкова се радвам за вас! (Tolkova se radvam za vas!)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “I’m so happy for you!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive and enthusiastic about the poster’s announcement.

    2- Бра-ку-ва-ни! (Bra-ku-va-ni!)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Just married!”
    Use this expression to make conversation that’s neutral.

    3- Честито! (Chestito!)

    Her supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional way of congratulating someone.

    4- Да остареете заедно! (Da ostareete zaedno!)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “May you both grow old together!”
    This is a warmhearted, positive wish for the couple’s future.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • хубав (hubav): “beautiful”
  • мечта (mechta): “dream”
  • толкова (tolkova): “so”
  • радвам се (radvam se): “be glad”
  • брак (brak): “marriage, scrap”
  • бракувам (brakuvam): “discard, scrap”
  • остарявам (ostaryavam): “grow old”
  • How would you respond in Bulgarian to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Bulgarian

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Bulgarian.

    Kamen finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Догодина по това време ще сме трима! (Dogodina po tova vreme shte sme trima!)
    “This time next year, there will be three of us!”

    1- Догодина по това време (Dogodina po tova vreme)

    First is an expression meaning - “This time next year”.
    This phrase can be used to express that what you are talking about will happen exactly one year from now.

    2- ще сме трима (shte sme trima)

    Then comes the phrase - “there will be three of us”.
    While a pregnant woman might announce this happy event in a straightforward manner by saying: “We’ll have a baby”, men might not feel comfortable talking so directly about it. They would prefer to use a more roundabout way of doing it, if they mention it at all, before the birth.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Да сте благословени! (Da ste blagosloveni!)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “May you be blessed!”
    Use this as a warmhearted blessing for the expecting couple.

    2- Браво на вас. (Bravo na vas.)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Good for you.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the news.

    3- Време e за малко шопинг. (Vreme e za malko shopping.)

    His wife’s high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “It’s time for some shopping.”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    4- Да сте живи и здрави. (Da ste zhivi i zdravi.)

    His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Health and prosperity.”
    Use this expression to wish the couple positive things for the future with their baby.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • догодина (dogodina): “next year”
  • време (vreme): “time”
  • благословен (blagosloven): “blessed”
  • браво (bravo): “well done”
  • малко (malko): “some”
  • жив (zhiv): “alive”
  • здрав (zdrav): “healthy”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Bulgarian Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Bulgarian.

    Yana plays with her baby, posts an image of the angel, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Малкото ми съкровище днес е в прекрасно настроение (Malkoto mi sakrovishte dnes e v prekrasno nastroenie.)
    “My little treasure is in a great mood today.”

    1- Малкото ми съкровище (Malkoto mi sakrovishte)

    First is an expression meaning “my little treasure .”
    Quite often parents and adults refer to small children by some phrase that describes their attitude or relationship to them rather than by their name. For example, the would say “my small treasure”, “gold”, “My Princess”, “beauty”, “young gentleman” and the like.

    2- днес е в прекрасно настроение (dnes e v prekrasno nastroenie)

    Then comes the phrase - “it is in a great mood today.”
    Bulgarians in general tend to describe their feelings and moods with moderate words - nice, good, gloomy, sad. When you hear them using superlative words such as splendid, fantastic, or spectacular, it indicates that they are either in a particularly good mood, or they are using it sarcastically.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Толкова чаровна усмивка. (Tolkova charovna usmivka.)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Such a charming smile.”
    Use this expression to give a compliment.

    2- Страхотни сте. (Strahotni ste.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “You are awesome.”
    Use this expression to be supportive and appreciative of the poster.

    3- Кога ще ви видим? (Koga shte vi vidim?)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “When will we see you?”
    Ask this question if you wish to make arrangements with the poster, presumably to meet the little one.

    4- Гъди-гъди (Gadi-gadi)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Tickle-tickle.”
    Use this expression to make conversation that pertains to the way one would play with a baby - ticking it.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • съкровище (sakrovishte): “treasure”
  • днес (dnes): “today”
  • прекрасен (prekrasen): “splendid”
  • настроение (nastroenie): “mood”
  • чаровен (charoven): “charming”
  • страхотен (strahoten): “great”
  • да се видим (da se vidim): “see each other”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Bulgarian! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Bulgarian Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Kamen goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Събра се рода̀та на пълна софра (Sabra se rodàta na palna sofra)
    “The family gathered around a rich table.”

    1- Събра се рода̀та (Sabra se rodàta)

    First is an expression meaning “The family gathered .”
    When you use this phrase, it implies that there is a special occasion and that the extended family has gotten together - this usually includes even 2nd or 3rd cousins.

    2- на пълна софра (na palna sofra)

    Then comes the phrase - “around a rich table.”
    “Sofra” is a word which remained in Bulgarian from the Turkish language. It is used rarely, and in this particular expression, it indicates that the table is rich and full of a variety of foods.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Наздраве! (Nazdrave!)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and want to make conversation by saluting the family.

    2- Догодина пак. (Dogodina pak.)

    His nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Next year again.”
    Use this expression to comment as a family member on the meeting.

    3- Много хубава енергия. (Mnogo hubava energiya.)

    His wife, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “Very positive energy.”
    Use this expression if you feel positive about meeting with your husband’s family.

    4- Къде бяхте? (Kade byahte?)

    His wife’s high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “Where were you?”
    Ask this question to show you are feeling curious regarding the party’s location.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • рода̀ (rodà): “kin, family”
  • събирам се (sabiram se): “get together”
  • пълен (palen): “full”
  • софра (sofra): “sofra, a table set for eating a meal”
  • енергия (energiya): “power, energy”
  • хубав (hubav): “nice”
  • къде (kade): “where”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Bulgarian

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know to post and leave comments in Bulgarian about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Yana waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    Заложници на бурния вятър вече два часа (Zalozhnitsi na burniya vyatar veche dva chasa)
    “Hostages of the stormy winds for two hours now.”

    1- Заложници на бурния вятър (Zalozhnitsi na burniya vyatar)

    First is an expression meaning “Hostages of the stormy winds .”
    “Hostage” is a common word to use in Bulgaria whenever extreme weather conditions make people feel helpless, constrained and bound to a specific place - a hut in a mountain, the station or, in this case, the airport.

    2- вече два часа (veche dva chasa)

    Then comes the phrase - “for two hours now.”
    Numbers one and two are specific in Bulgarian as they change according to gender. When it comes to “two”, you can see it as “две/dve” for feminine and neuter, “два/dva” for nouns in masculine, and “двама/dvama” when you talk about “two males” in particular.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Търпение. (Tarpenie.)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Be patient.”
    Use this expression to offer simple, supportive advice.

    2- Поне полетът е кратък. (Pone poletat e kratak.)

    Her husband, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “At least it’s a short flight.”
    Use this expression to offer a supportive way to look at the situation.

    3- За къде летиш? (Za kade letish?)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you flying to?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s destination. Questions are a great way to make conversation.

    4- Късмет. (Kasmet.)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Best of luck.”
    Use this expression if you mean to wish the poster well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • заложник (zalozhnik): “hostage”
  • бурен (buren): “stormy”
  • вятър (vyatar): “wind”
  • търпение (tarpenie): “patience”
  • полет (polet): “flight”
  • кратък (kratak): “short”
  • летя (letya): “fly”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Bulgarian!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Bulgarian

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Bulgarian phrases!

    Kamen finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Упоритостта се отплаща с истинска находка на пазара. (Uporitostta se otplashta s istinska nahodka na pazara.)
    “Persistence pays off with a genuine find at the local market.”

    1- Упоритостта се отплаща с (Uporitostta se otplashta s)

    First is an expression meaning “Persistence pays off with”.
    Although Bulgarians are often sceptical people, they do want to believe that good qualities and efforts pay off, therefore this expression is quite common. It can start with words as persistence, hard work, politeness, kindness, and so on.

    2- истинска находка на пазара (istinska nahodka na pazara)

    Then comes the phrase - “a genuine find at the local market”.
    In a few cities, apart from the farmers market, some other smaller marketplaces or specialized sections of a larger one can be found, where people would sell small collectables, antiques, books or knitting decorations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Винаги! (Vinagi!)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Always does!”
    Use this expression if you’re in agreement with the poster’s comment.

    2- Какво е това? (Kakvo e tova?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “What is this?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s find.

    3- Идеално ще ти пасне в хола. (Idealno shte ti pasne v hola.)

    His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “It will fit so nicely in your living room.”
    This is a personal opinion, one probably best suited if you know the poster’s home.

    4- Изглежда интересно. (Izglezhda interesno.)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Looks interesting.”
    Use this expression to make positive conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • упоритост (uporitost): “persistence”
  • отплащам се (otplashtam se): “pay back”
  • истински (istinski): “genuine”
  • находка (nahodka): “finding”
  • пазар (pazar): “market”
  • идеален (idealen): “perfect”
  • пасвам (pasvam): “fit”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Bulgarian

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Bulgarian, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Yana visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    На Айфеловата кула - една сбъдната мечта (Na Ayfelovata kula - edna sbadnata mechta)
    “At the Eiffel Tower - a dream come true.”

    1- На Айфеловата кула (Na Ayfelovata kula)

    First is an expression meaning “At the Eiffel Tower”.
    Even when Bulgarians were not able to travel a lot in Europe, French language and movies have always been popular. The Eiffel Tower is still the symbol for something distant, desired and romantic.

    2- една сбъдната мечта (edna sbadnata mechta)

    Then comes the phrase - “a dream come true”.
    Visiting the Eiffel Tower is still a fervent dream for some. Even if they happen to visit Paris, but do not manage to get on the Eiffel Tower, they will feel disappointed and dissatisfied with their trip.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Грееш от радост… (Greesh ot radost̷ ;)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “You are shining with joy…”
    Use this expression to comment on the poster’s radiant appearance.

    2- Кой те снима? (Koy te snima?)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “Who took the shot for you?”
    Use this expression to make fun of the poster by being unbelieving and questioning the authenticity of the picture. Or, if you’re really curious and want more detail.

    3- Време е за нови планове (Vreme e za novi planove)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “It’s time for new plans now”.
    This expression means that the poster has fulfilled one goal, and now it’s time to find new ones. A positive, optimistic comment.

    4- Доживя значи. (Dozhivya znachi.)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “You lived to see it then.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling pleased together with the poster for fulfilling this life-long dream.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • сбъднат (sbadnat): “come true, accomplished”
  • мечта (mechta): “dream”
  • грея (greya): “glow”
  • радост (radost): “joy”
  • снимам (snimam): “take a photo, shoot”
  • нов (nov): “new”
  • да доживея (da dozhiveya): “to live long enough to see”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Bulgarian

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Bulgarian!

    Kamen relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Почивка след няколко часа гмуркане. (Pochivka sled nyakolko chasa gmurkane.)
    “Some relaxation after a few hours of scuba diving.”

    1- Почивка (Pochivka)

    First is an expression meaning “break, holiday, relax time”.
    This is a general word used to describe the time spent relaxing or off work, whether it’s a few minutes break or a dreamed of holiday trip.

    2- след няколко часа гмуркане (sled nyakolko chasa gmurkane)

    Then comes the phrase - “after a few hours of scuba diving”.
    Diving in the Black Sea is possible but is not considered such an exciting pastime. The sea has little vegetation and quickly goes very deep. Therefore, if a person says they scuba dived, it is implied that they took a holiday somewhere abroad in a warmer and more exotic destination.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Завиждам ви. (Zavizhdam vi.)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “I envy you.”
    Use this expression to show you wish you were engaged in the same activity as the poster.

    2- Вече е поизтъркано, брат. (Veche e poiztarkano, brat.)

    His nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “It’s already clichéd, bro.”
    This is a personal opinion that could be construed as cynical criticism, so best reserved this for friends and family whom you know well, and vice versa.

    3- Добре изглежда. (Dobre izglezhda.)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “It looks quite nice.”
    Use this pleasant comment just to make conversation.

    4- Ех, райско е. (Eh, raysko e.)

    His wife, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “Ah, it seems like paradise.”
    This fulfills the same function as the previous one, but it is put more originally.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • почивка (pochivka): “break, relaxation”
  • гмуркане (gmurkane): “scuba diving”
  • завиждам (zavizhdam): “envy”
  • изглеждам (izglezhdam): “look like, seem”
  • райски (rayski): “heavenly, from the paradise”
  • добре (dobre): “well”
  • поизтъркан (poiztarkan): “worn out”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Bulgarian When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Yana returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    У дома след незабравимо плаване из островите. (U doma sled nezabravimo plavane iz ostrovite.)
    “Finally home after a memorable sailing trip around the islands.”

    1- У дома след (U doma sled)

    First is an expression meaning “at home after.”
    There are a few expressions to say “at home” in Bulgarian. This particular one implies the sense of longing, homecoming, and belonging. “У дома/ u doma” refers to the place where you feel like your real self, not just the place where you currently reside.

    2- незабравимо плаване из островите (nezabravimo plavane iz ostrovite)

    Then comes the phrase - “a memorable sailing trip around the islands…”
    There are seven Bulgarian islands in the Black Sea. Sailing to them is not very popular because most of them used to be military areas with restricted access, making sailing to or around them not possible. Therefore, the Greek islands are the closest place Bulgarians can go sailing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Иска ми се да беше продължило. (Iska mi se da beshe prodalzhilo.)

    Her husband, Kamen, uses an expression meaning - “I wish it could have lasted longer.”
    Use this expression to share an opinion.

    2- Чакам подаръци. (Chakam podaratsi.)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “I am awaiting for the gifts.”
    Use this expression if you expect gifts from the poster.

    3- Нова чанта ли виждам? (Nova chanta li vizhdam?)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “Do I see a new handbag?”
    Use this expression if you’re playful and curious about what you see in the photo.

    4- Свежарка си. (Svezharka si.)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “You look so fresh.”
    Use this expression to compliment the poster’s appearance.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • у дома (u doma): “at home”
  • незабравим (nezabravim): “unforgettable”
  • плаване (plavane): “sailing”
  • остров (ostrov): “island”
  • продължавам (prodalzhavam): “continue”
  • иска ми се (iska mi se): “I wish”
  • подарък (podarak): “gift, present”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Liberation Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Bulgarian

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Kamen observes Liberation Day, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Незаменима енергия в Деня на Освобождението (Nezamenima energiya v Denya na Osvobozhdenieto)
    “Unique energy on Liberation Day.”

    1- Незаменима енергия (Nezamenima energiya)

    First is an expression meaning “Unique energy .”
    As you remember, adjectives in Bulgarian change according to gender and number. In the vocabulary section, we only mention their masculine form, but it is a good practice to repeat all the gender forms when trying to memorize adjectives.

    2- в Деня на Освобождението (v Denya na Osvobozhdenieto)

    Then comes the phrase - “on the Liberation Day.”
    It is interesting to know that 30 years passed between the Day of Liberation and the Day of Bulgarian Independence. However, Liberation Day is much more festive for a lot of Bulgarians, as it is related to a very dramatic battle that happened on March 3, in the Bulgarian Mountain range, which includes the Shipka-Sheinovo mountain. This day marked the beginning of Bulgaria becoming a free, democratic country when it was liberated from Ottoman dominion.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Толкова е ветровито на Шипка. (Tolkova e vetrovito na Shipka.)

    His nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “It’s so windy on Shipka.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical.

    2- Защо не се обади да дойда и аз? (Zashto ne se obadi da doyda i az?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Why didn’t you call so that I could have joined?”
    Use this expression if you feel excluded.

    3- Страхотно е тук! (Strahotno e tuk!)

    His wife, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “It’s amazing here!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling in awe of your location.

    4- Догодина пак. (Dogodina pak.)

    His high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “(Let’s go) again next year.”
    Use this expression to show you enjoyed the experience and wish to repeat it next year.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • незаменим (nezamenim): “irreplaceable”
  • енергия (energiya): “power, energy”
  • ветровит (vetrovit): “windy”
  • да се обадя (da se obadya): “to give a call”
  • да дойда (da doyda): “come”
  • страхотен (strahoten): “great”
  • тук (tuk): “here”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Liberation Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Bulgarian

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Yana goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    За първи път гост на собственото си парти (Za parvi pat gost na sobstvenoto si parti)
    “A guest to my own party for the first time.”

    1- За първи път (Za parvi pat)

    First is an expression meaning “for the first time..”
    Social media is a convenient means of sharing first-time experiences with many friends simultaneously.

    2- гост на собственото си парти (gost na sobstvenoto si parti)

    Then comes the phrase - “a guest to my own party .”
    In Bulgaria, it is usually the birthday person who organizes the party and invites friends, rather than the other way around. Surprise parties are not a common event, so when they do happen, they’re quite unexpected for the birthday person.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Успяхме, нали? (Uspyahme, nali?)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “We made it, didn’t we?”
    Use this expression to make conversation about the surprise party.

    2- Наздраве! (Nazdrave!)

    Her college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers!”
    Use this expression to congratulate the birthday person in a casual manner.

    3- Какво си пожела? (Kakvo si pozhela?)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “What wish did you make?”
    Ask this question to demonstrate your interest in the topic and to keep the conversation going.

    4- Честит рожден ден! (Chestit rozhden den!)

    Her supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Birthday!”
    This is a traditional birthday wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • гост (gost): “guest”
  • първи (parvi): “first”
  • собствен (sobstven): “own”
  • парти (parti): “party”
  • успявам (uspyavam): “manage to”
  • какво (kakvo): “what”
  • пожелавам си (pozhelavam si): “I wish for myself”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Bulgarian

    Impress your friends with your Bulgarian New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Kamen celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Нова година с още повече късмет! (Nova godina s oshte poveche kasmet!)
    “A new year with even more luck!”

    1- Нова година (Nova godina)

    First is an expression meaning “A New Year”.
    New Year’s Eve is an occasion to go party with friends, organize a noisy house party, or celebrate somewhere in the mountains with company. The new year is associated with new beginnings. Different rituals for prosperity used to be performed around it.

    2- с още повече късмет (s oshte poveche kasmet)

    Then comes the phrase - “with even more luck.”
    New Year’s wishes usually include words for health, prosperity, good luck, money and success.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- За много години! (Za mnogo godini!)

    His wife, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “For many years on!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling festive and agree with the poster.

    2- Шампанско да се лее. (Shampansko da se lee.)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “May the champagne flow freely.”
    Use this phrase as an unconventional prosperity-wish for New Year.

    3- Здрава и благополучна! (Zdrava i blagopoluchna!)

    His neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “Health and prosperity!”
    This is a common exclamation when you want to wish someone good health and a prosperous future.

    4- ЧНГ! (CHNG!)

    His wife’s high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “HNY! (abbreviation for Happy New Year!)”
    Use this expression as a modern, casual New Year’s wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • късмет (kasmet): “luck”
  • година (godina): “year”
  • повече (poveche): “more”
  • още (oshte): “(some) more”
  • лея се (leya se): “flow freely, run fast (for liquid)”
  • благополучен (blagopoluchen): “prosperous”
  • Ч.Н.Г. (Ch.N.G.): “Ch. n. g. (abbreviation for Happy New Year)”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Bulgarian

    What will you say in Bulgarian about Christmas?

    Yana celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Yana’s post.

    А преди години са седeли на пода върху слама… (A predi godini sa sedeli na poda varhu slama̷ ;)
    “Years ago they used to sit on the floor (on) straw…”

    1- А преди години са седeли (A predi godini sa sedeli)

    First is an expression meaning “Years ago they used to sit”.
    Christmas Eve and Christmas days are strictly family events in Bulgaria. When the majority of the population used to live in rural areas, there were rituals related to the richness and prosperity of the house performed on these days.

    2- на пода върху слама. (na poda varhu slama.)

    Then comes the phrase - “on the floor (on) straw”.
    Sitting on straw was part of the ritual for abundant cereal crops and the health of family members.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Yana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Истински семеен празник (Istinski semeen praznik)

    Her neighbor, Gergana, uses an expression meaning - “That’s a real family celebration.”
    This is a general comment and positive personal observation.

    2- Харесвам прогреса. (Haresvam progresa.)

    Her high school friend, Veneta, uses an expression meaning - “I love progress.”
    Use this expression to be humorous, but it might be offensive to Christians who are serious and conservative about their faith. Therefore, it would be best to be sensitive who you say this to.

    3- Взе ли пара̀та? (Vze li parata?)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Silviya, uses an expression meaning - “Did you get the coin?”
    It is the custom to eat Bulgarian Christmas bread called “koledna pitka” on Christmas Eve, which traditionally has a silver coin tucked in. It’s the belief that the person who finds the coin would have good fortune. Obviously, ask this question if you’re curious about who found the lucky coin.

    4- А не, благодаря. Не е за мен. (A ne, blagodarya. Ne e za men.)

    Her nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “No, thanks. That’s not for me.”
    Use this phrase to express your personal opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • преди (predi): “ago, before”
  • седя (sedya): “sit down”
  • под (pod): “floor”
  • слама (slama): “straw”
  • истински (istinski): “real”
  • семеен (semeen): “family”
  • пара̀ (parà): “old coin”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Bulgarian

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Bulgarian phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Kamen celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Kamen’s post.

    Преди година тя каза “ДА” пред всички (Predi godina tya kaza “DA” pred vsichki)
    “A year ago she said “Yes” in front of everyone.”

    1- Преди година тя каза “ДА” (Predi godina tya kaza “DA” )

    First is an expression meaning “A year ago she said “Yes”.
    In order for a marriage to be legal in Bulgaria, the couple must sign an official document in front of witnesses. This document is a free and explicit declaration of their mutual desire to get married.

    2- пред всички (pred vsichki)

    Then comes the phrase - “in front of everyone”.
    Apart from the civic ritual, the couple can also decide to have a church wedding. As the church ceremony is not so much focused on the couple themselves but on their relationship with God, there is actually not a single moment when the bride and groom are asked to exchange vows.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Kamen’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Кога мина година? (Koga mina godina?)

    His college friend, Kosyo, uses an expression meaning - “When did a whole year pass by?”
    Use this phrase to express your amazement at how fast time went.

    2- Бъдете щастливи заедно още безброй години. (Badete shtastlivi zaedno oshte bezbroy godini.)

    His wife, Yana, uses an expression meaning - “Be happy together for countless years ahead.”
    Use this expression if you want to wish your marriage well on your anniversary.

    3- Честита годишнина! (Chestita godishnina!)

    His supervisor, Plamen, uses an expression meaning - “Happy anniversary!”
    This is the traditional anniversary well-wish.

    4- Живи и здрави! (Zhivi i zdravi!)

    His nephew, Vasil, uses an expression meaning - “Be alive and happy!”
    This is another good wish that’s appropriate for the occasion, but not traditional.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • всички (vsichki): “all, everyone”
  • пред (pred): “in front of”
  • преди (predi): “ago, before”
  • минавам (minavam): “go by, pass by”
  • щастлив (shtastliv): “happy”
  • заедно (zaedno): “together”
  • безброй (bezbroy): “countless”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Bulgarian! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    Celebrating Revival Leaders’ Day in Bulgaria

    There is a special holiday in Bulgaria dedicated to the national revival leaders. These leaders of the Bulgarian people are bookmen and revolutionaries; people who through the different periods of time had helped with the enlightenment of the Bulgarian people.

    In this article, you’ll learn about Revival Leaders’ Day (sometimes called National Revival Day) and how Bulgarians celebrate. Further, we’ll provide you with some information on those involved in the Bulgarian national revival.

    At BulgarianPod101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your learning journey both fun and informative!

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    1. What is Revival Leaders’ Day?

    The Day of the Bulgarian National Revival Leaders is a public holiday, celebrated annually with torchlight processions. The holiday emerged as a way of commemorating the work of people who helped in the national liberation movement of the country. The role of such people in the revival and promotion of the Bulgarian spirit through hard historic events is very important.

    Who are the national leaders honored on this day? They include Saint Ivan of Rila, Paìsiy Hilendàrski (Paisius of Hilendar), Vasil Levski, Hristo Botev, Ivan Vazov, and many other people who had contributed to the development of Bulgaria through history. The church holiday on which the Day of Saint Ivan of Rila was commemorated turned into an official holiday under the name Day of the Bulgarian National Revival Leaders.

    In 1945, the communist regime in Bulgaria revoked the holiday celebration, because it was in contradiction with the propaganda and censorship imposed at that time. Despite this, it was celebrated unofficially, and in 1992 it became an official holiday again. Since 2002, on this day, the national flag in front of the Presidency is raised and the changing of the sentry takes place, as on other big holidays.

    2. When is National Revival Leaders’ Day?

    Bulgarian Flag

    Each year, Bulgarians celebrate the Bulgarian Revival Leaders’ Day on November 1.

    3. Popular Revival Day Traditions & Celebrations

    A Special Program

    The Day of the Bulgarian National Revival Leaders is a non-attendance day for all schools. Instead, the Bulgarian high school and university students hold parades, while the museums offer free admission.

    As mentioned earlier, there are also torchlight processions on this day. Other festivities include masses for the dead and special school programs related to the Bulgarian revival.

    4. Two Other Holidays

    What else is celebrated on the Day of the Bulgarian National Revival Leaders?

    Since 1991, November 1 has also been regarded and celebrated as the Day of Bulgarian Science and the Day of Bulgarian Journalism. On this day, the Union of Bulgarian Journalists gives its annual awards.

    5. Essential Revival Leaders’ Day Vocabulary

    View of Misty Land from Above

    Here’s the most essential vocabulary you should know for Revival Leaders’ Day!

    • Паисий Хилендарски
      Paisii Hilendarski
      Paisius of Hilendar
    • Прекланям се
      Preklanyam se
      Bow
    • Просветител
      Prosvetitel
      Enlightener
    • Възраждам се
      Vazrazhdam se
      Resuscitate
    • Възрожденски
      Vazrozhdenski
      Renaissance
    • Държавен суверенитет
      Darzhaven suverenitet
      State sovereignty
    • Памет
      Pamet
      Memory
    • Отменен
      Otmenen
      Canceled
    • Свети Иоан Рилски
      Sveti Ioan Rilski
      Saint John of Rila
    • Национално самосъзнание
      Natsionalno samosaznanie
      National identity awareness
    • Наум
      Naum
      In one’s mind
    • Уважаван
      Uvazhavan
      Respected
    • Подражавам
      Podrazhavam
      Imitate
    • Празнична програма
      Praznichna programa
      Festive program
    • Панихида
      Panihida
      Mass for the dead
    • Последовател
      Posledovatel
      Follower

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Revival Leaders’ Day vocabulary list! Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation, alongside a relevant image.

    Final Thoughts

    Man Scratching Head

    We hope you enjoyed learning a little bit about Revival Leaders’ Day with us, and that you took away some valuable information!

    Does your country have a holiday for honoring important historical figures? Let us know in the comments!

    Learning about a country’s culture may be the funnest part of trying to master a language. At BulgarianPod101.com, we have fun and effective lessons on many aspects of Bulgaria and its people. For further learning, you may want to check out one of the following pages:

    Learning a new language is no easy feat, but practice and consistency are key. At BulgarianPod101, we believe that you really can master the language, and we’ll be here with help and encouragement on every step of your language-learning journey!

    Happy learning!

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    How to Say Sorry in Bulgarian

    Thumbnail

    Learn how to apologize in Bulgarian - fast and accurately! BulgarianPod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Bulgarian Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Bulgarian
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Bulgarian
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Bulgarian through BulgarianPod101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Bulgarian

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Bulgarian. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Съжалявам (Sazhalyavam)
    I’m Sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Bulgarian or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Бих искал да се извиня (Bih iskal da se izvinya).
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Bulgarian. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Искрено се извинявам (Iskreno se izvinyavam).
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Няма да се повтори (Nyama da se povtori).
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Ще се постарая да не правя същата грешка отново (Shte se postaraya da ne pravya sashtata greshka otnovo).
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    Не исках да се получи така (Ne iskah da se poluchi taka).
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Вината е моя (Vinata e moya).
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Съжалявам за това, че съм такъв егоист (Sazhalyavam za tova, che sam takav egoist).
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Надявам се, че ми прощаваш (Nadyavam se, che mi proshtavash).
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Аз поемем пълната отговорност (Az poemem palnata otgovornost).
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Не трябваше да постъпвам така (Ne tryabvashe da postapvam taka).
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Съжалявам, че ти връщам късно парите (Sazhalyavam, che ti vrashtam kasno parite).
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Моля те, не ми се сърди (Molya te, ne mi se sardi).
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Извинявам се за закъснението (Izvinyavam se za zakasnenieto).
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Извинявам се, че се държах така лошо с теб (Izvinyavam se, che se darzhah taka losho s teb.
    ).

    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Bulgarian

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Bulgarian! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at BulgarianPod101 about how to use the correct Bulgarian words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Bulgarian? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Bulgarian. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Bulgarian through BulgarianPod101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! BulgarianPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Bulgarian!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Bulgarian with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Bulgarian dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about BulgarianPod101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Bulgarian teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Bulgarian word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Bulgarian level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Bulgarian, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in BulgarianPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Bulgarian!

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    Unification Day: Bulgarian Traditions and Celebrations

    Unification Day marks the date that Bulgaria, after a time of separation under the Treaty of Berlin, experienced unification in 1885.

    So when did Bulgaria gain independence? The country had gained independence from the Ottoman Empire just a few years earlier in 1878. Essentially, the Unification of Bulgaria furthered Bulgaria independence, and created a more stable, strengthened nation.

    In this article, you’ll learn the history and events surrounding Unification Day, and delve into Bulgarian celebrations of this holiday.

    At BulgarianPod101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both fun and informative. So let’s get started!

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    1. What is Bulgarian Unification Day?

    This day commemorates the unification of Southern Bulgaria, then known as Eastern Rumelia and under Ottoman control, with the independent Principality of Bulgaria in 1885.

    The Unification of Bulgaria was an act necessary for the integrity of the Bulgarian state. The 1878 Treaty of Berlin enacted the separation of Bulgaria and the Principality of Bulgaria and Eastern Rumelia. In doing this, the treaty actually tore the national integrity of the Bulgarian people.

    The Bulgarians, however, did not accept this separation. They started acting to annex Eastern Rumelia, which, in accordance with the treaty, was an autonomous province under the authority of the Ottoman Empire, to the Principality of Bulgaria.

    The Unification of Bulgaria was conducted by the so-called Bulgarian Secret Central Revolutionary Committee (BSCRC). Certain cities in Eastern Rumelia rose in revolt and this led to a military coup d’état on September 6, 1885.

    This coup received support from Prince Alexander I—the first Bulgarian prince after the Liberation of Bulgaria. So the Unification was realized on this date, but received international recognition months later.

    2. When is Bulgarian Unification Day?

    Bulgarian Flag

    Each year on 6 September, Bulgarians celebrate Unification Day.

    3. Bulgarian Celebrations for Unification Day

    People Celebrating

    Today, on Unification Day, Bulgarians celebrate with various events in the capital and in Plovdiv—a chief city in the historic events around the Unification—as well as in other cities such as Varna, Burgas, Veliko Tarnovo, Kyustendil, Sliven, and Vidin.

    In Sofia, in front of the ossuary mausoleum of Prince Alexander I Battenberg, on Vasil Levski Boulevard, people deliver speeches for the occasion. As with the celebration of the Liberation, on this day too, a solemn changing of the sentry of honor in front of the Presidency takes place.

    4. Modern-Day Bulgaria

    Which parts of modern-day Bulgaria made up the Principality of Bulgaria and Eastern Rumelia?

    Although the name Eastern Rumelia creates the impression that this is the eastern part of Bulgaria, Eastern Rumelia is actually part of modern-day South Bulgaria, stretching between the Balkan Mountains and the Rhodope Mountains.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for Unification Day in Bulgaria

    A Cannon

    Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for Unification Day in Bulgaria!

    Bulgarian Romanization English
    Ден на Съединението на България Den na Syedinenieto na Bylgariya Unification Day
    независимост nezavisimost independence
    празнуване praznuvane celebration
    Източна Румелия Iztochna Rumeliya Eastern Rumelia
    Княжество България Knyazhestvo Balgariya Principality of Bulgaria
    Обединена България Obedinena Balgariya Unified Bulgaria
    обединение obedinenie unification
    военен преврат voenen prevrat military coup
    сливане slivane merger
    международно признание mezhdunarodno priznanie international recognition

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Bulgarian Unification Day vocabulary list!

    How BulgarianPod101 Can Help You Learn About Bulgarian Culture

    We hope you enjoyed learning about Bulgarian Unification Day with us! Are there any similar holidays or observations in your own country? Tell us about it in the comments; we always look forward to hearing from you!

    To continue learning about Bulgarian culture and studying the language, explore BulgarianPod101.com. We provide an array of fun and engaging learning tools for every learner, at every level:

    • Insightful blog posts on a range of cultural and language-related topics
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    • Much, much more!

    If you’re interested in a more one-on-one learning approach, be sure to upgrade to Premium Plus. Doing so will give you access to your own Bulgarian tutor who will help you develop a learning plan based on your needs and goals. Yes, really!

    At BulgarianPod101.com, we want to make learning all things Bulgarian as fun and simple as possible, while still providing you with top-quality content. Our constant support, plus your hard work and determination, can ensure your language-learning success! :)

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    How to Celebrate the Feast Day of Prophet Elijah in Bulgaria

    The_Feast_Day_of_Prophet_Elijah_in_Bulgaria
    The Saint Elijah Feast Day in Bulgaria is a huge event, rooted in both history and folklore. In this article, we’ll answer the question “Who is Prophet Elijah?” and provide you with interesting information on this Bulgarian holiday, and the traditions associated with it.

    In learning about Saint Elijah Feast Day, you’re learning so much more! This is just one moving part in the complexity of Bulgarian culture, history, and religion, and knowing about these things will significantly improve your Bulgarian language-learning!

    At BulgarianPod101.com, we hope to make this learning adventure both fun and informative!

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    1. What is St. Elijah’s Day in Bulgaria?

    The Saint Elijah Feast Day is when Bulgarians commemorate and celebrate the Prophet Elijah (also known as St. Elijah). This is also a name day for those with names similar to Ilenden, which is yet another name for this holiday.

    Who is Elijah the Prophet?

    Saint Elijah—patron saint of tailors, and master of the elements of rain, thunder, and lightning—is considered a great of the Old Testament and is also a prominent figure in Bulgarian folklore. In the Bible, Elijah the prophet of God performed many miracles, combatted paganism, and is perhaps most well-known for never actually dying, but rather being taken up to God in a chariot of fire.

    Prophet Elijah miracles include raising people from the dead and causing fire to fall from the sky.

    In terms of folklore, Prophet Elijah is thought to control the elements involved in thunderstorms and similar natural occurrences.

    2. When is St. Elijah Day?

    Prophet Elijah in Stained Glass

    Each year, St. Elijah’s Day takes place on July 20 (though there is another similar celebration on August 2).

    3. How do Bulgarians Celebrate the Saint Elijah Feast Day?

    Hands Folded in Prayer

    There’s a variety of traditions and celebrations for the St. Elijah Feast Day, many rooted in folklore.

    The most common St. Elijah Day tradition is that of offering a sacrifice. Bulgarian towns will sacrifice a bull or a calf, in hopes that the sacrifice will satisfy St. Elijah and thus protect the town from bad storms. In the same vein, farmers pray to St. Elijah for rain in order to maintain healthy crops; Bulgarians also pray to Elijah for health and fertility.

    Further, women bake bread for St. Elijah, namely bogovitsa and kolach, and Bulgarians enjoy sharing stories about the saint. Another fun tradition is that of fire dancing. During this fire dancing ceremony, some people walk on the fire barefooted!

    Many Bulgarians believe that it’s bad luck to go swimming on St. Elijah Feast Day, especially in the Black Sea. According to superstition, St. Elijah will take those who go swimming as a sacrifice!

    4. Uprising Remembrance

    July 20 also marks the anniversary of the Ilinden-Preobrazhenie Uprising. During this uprising, Bulgaria set out against the Ottoman Empire to unify Bulgarian-populated territories. This event lasted approximately eleven days and was only partially successful.

    The official remembrance day for the Ilinden-Preobrazhenie Uprising is August 2.

    5. Vocabulary You Should Know for St. Elijah’s Day

    Hands Holding Light

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for St. Elijah’s Day in Bulgaria!

    • Гръмотевица (gramotevitsa) — thunder
    • Жертва (zhertva) — sacrifice
    • Свети пророк Илия (Sveti prorok Iliya) — Prophet Elijah
    • Илинденско-Преображенско въстание (Ilindensko-Preobrazhensko vastanie) — Ilinden–Preobrazhenie Uprising
    • Събор (sabor) — congregation
    • Градушка (gradushka) — hail
    • Бунт (bunt) — revolt
    • Стар Завет (Star Zavet) — Old Testament
    • Чудотворец (chudotvorets) — wonderworker
    • Крепост (krepost) — fortress
    • езическо божество (ezichesko bozhestvo) — pagan deity
    • моля се (molya se) — pray
    • Удрям (udryam) — strike
    • Завалявам (zavalyavam) — start to rain

    To hear each vocabulary word pronounced, check out our Bulgarian St. Elijah’s Day vocabulary list!

    Conclusion

    What do you think of St. Elijah Feast Day, and the Bulgarian folklore surrounding it? Did you learn anything new today? Let us know in the comments; we always look forward to hearing from you!

    To continue learning about Bulgarian culture and the language, explore BulgarianPod101.com and take advantage of our fun and practical learning tools. Read more insightful blog posts like this one, study our free Bulgarian vocabulary lists, and become a part of our online community! By upgrading to Premium Plus, you can also begin using our MyTeacher program, which allows you to learn Bulgarian according to a more personalized plan with your own teacher.

    Learning Bulgarian isn’t easy, but know that your hard work will pay off and you’ll be speaking, writing, and reading Bulgarian like your first language before you know it! And BulgarianPod101 will be here with you each step of your journey there.

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