Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky:
Hello and welcome back to BulgarianPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 24 - Talking About Your Feelings in Bulgarian. I’m Becky.
Iva:
Zdravei And I’m Iva!
Becky:
In this lesson, you'll learn how to talk about emotions in Bulgarian.
Iva:
The conversation takes place in the hotel lobby.
Becky:
It’s between Maria and James.
Iva:
They’re friends now, so their speech is informal.
Becky:
Let’s listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky:
So Maria and James are expressing their feelings in a typical Bulgarian way here, right?
Iva:
I think so. So let’s talk about when Bulgarians show their affection.
Becky:
I know that like in a lot of other countries, Bulgarians show their love on Valentine’s Day.
Iva:
But February 14th is also a day when all winemakers and producers are celebrated. So that means Bulgarians have two reasons to celebrate, which means a day full of parties, presents, and surprises
.
Becky:
The most common gifts among couples are flowers, hearts and teddy bears.
Iva:
The streets of the big cities are full of flower shops and heart-shaped balloons, just for the occasion.
Becky:
But while lovers celebrate St Valentine's Day, many Bulgarians insist February 14th should be reserved for the more traditional Bulgarian celebration we just mentioned...
Iva:
...the feast of St. Trifon Zarezan, the patron of vine growing and wine producing.
Becky:
This offers a nice alternative to those who don't have a loved one to share the holiday with, so they can still have a reason to celebrate.
Iva:
So it’s a win-win situation!
Becky:
Ok, now let’s move on to the vocab.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky:
Let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Iva:
First we have “Приятно”
Becky:
This is an adverb that means “pleasantly”.
Iva:
It’s used in the common expression “Приятно ми е да се запознаем”, which is “Nice to meet you” in English.
Becky:
Ah, that’s useful.
Iva:
It also has an adjective form, which in masculine is “приятен”, in feminine is “приятна”, in neuter is “приятно”, and in plural is “приятни”.
Becky:
OK. Listeners, repeat those again after Iva.
Iva:
Masculine is “приятен” [pause], “приятна” [pause], neuter is “приятно”[pause], and plural is “приятни”[pause].
Becky:
OK, what’s next?
Iva:
“Нямам” is a verb that means “to not have” or “don’t have”.
Becky:
So you can conjugate it?
Iva:
Yes. Its forms are: “I don’t have” - “нямам”; “you don’t have” - “нямаш”; “he/she/it doesn’t have”- “няма”; “we don’t have” - “нямаме”; “you don’t have” - “нямате”; “they don’t have” - “нямат”.
Becky:
And our last word is?
Iva:
“Отново”
Becky:
This is an adverb meaning “again”.
Iva:
It is composed of the preposition “от” meaning “of”, “by”, “from”, or “for”; and the word “ново” which is the adverb “new”.
Becky:
What else?
B(native):
The adjective forms of “new” are: “нов” for the masculine; “нова” for the feminine; “ново” for the neuter and “нови” for the plural.
Becky:
Okay! Let’s move onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Becky:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about emotions in Bulgarian. Basically in Bulgarian, affection is shown in two different degrees.
Iva:
Yes. You can say “I like you” or “I love you”.
Becky:
In this lesson, we’re going to see how to express likes and emotions in the first case.
Iva:
A simple sentence can be “Аз те харесвам.”
Becky:
This means “I like you.”
Iva:
Note that in informal language, you usually skip the pronoun “I” which is “аз”, and the sentence will change like this: “Харесвам те”.
Becky:
The important thing here is that the pronoun for “you” moves to the end of the sentence.
Iva:
This is a basic rule in Bulgarian: if we have the personal pronoun like “I”, we need the direct object, the pronoun “you” next and then the verb.
Becky:
But if, because of the language simplicity or everyday level of the speech, you omit the personal pronoun, you have to put the verb first, then the pronoun denoting the person you are directing the action at.
Iva:
We had this in the dialogue too.
Becky:
Can you remind us where?
Iva:
James said to Maria “Харесвам те и бих искал да те видя отново”.
Becky:
Oh, yes! He said “I like you and I would like to see you again.” What if we need to say “I don’t like you”? Well, this can also happen…In these situations, you have to add just a simple “no”, just like in English.
Iva:
So the same sentence will change like this: “Не те харесвам” or “(I) don’t like you” for the simple case, and “Аз не те харесвам” or “I don’t like you” for the full version of the sentence, with the personal pronoun included.
Becky:
Here, it is important to note that we don’t have different word order.
Iva:
That’s right. The “не” stays in one place, like the other words. Just the personal pronoun “I” is omitted.
Becky:
Can you repeat it again?
Iva:
“Не те харесвам”
Becky:
“I don’t like you”
Iva:
And the nice one…
Becky:
Yes, please, the positive one, we don’t want to end with dislikes…
Iva:
OK. “Аз те харесвам.” Or just “Харесвам те”.
Becky:
Awesome!
Iva:
Now you can find more examples…
Becky:
In the lesson notes, of course!
Iva:
So please check them!
Becky:
And practice repeating the examples.
Iva:
That’s it for this lesson.

Outro

Becky:
Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Iva:
Bye bye.

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